Vintage: Ruinart x David Shrigley

Ruinart has collaborated with the British artist on a collection of quirky, humorous and poignant artworks inspired by the champagne house

Art and Design 9 Apr 2020

Shrigley says of the phrase 'each bottle is the same, each bottle is different' that it is true of champagne and art: "Each time you hang something on the wall, or place it on the floor, its character is altered." David Shrigley, Untitled 2019, Acrylic on paper, 76 x 56cm
Shrigley shows his deep concern fo the environment in many of the works made as part of the Ruinart collaboration. David Shrigley, Untitled 2019, Acrylic on paper, 76 x 56cm
Shrigley's whimsical and playfuil sense of humour comes through in the work produced as part of the Ruinart Carte Blanche project. David Shrigley, Untitled 2019, Acrylic on paper, 76 x 56cm
David Shrigley evokes the pleasure of the grape harvest. David Shrigley, Untitled 2019, Acrylic on paper, 76 x 56cm
Shrigley takes viewers through the journey of champagne production through the work produced as part of the Maison Ruinart Carte Blanche project. David Shrigley, Untitled 2019, Acrylic on paper, 76 x 56cm

Every year since 2008, champagne house Ruinart has collaborated with a different contemporary artist, giving them carte blanche to create something unique while exploring their vision of the Maison. The house is known for its centuries-old connection to the art world and has continued this association into the present day with support for some of the world’s most prestigious fairs including Frieze, Art Basel and PAD.

This year Ruinart has worked with British artist David Shrigley to create 42 works of art that explore his experience of the champagne house. Shrigley has applied his renowned sense of humour and quirky take on the world to exploring the themes most important to Ruinart, including the house’s heritage, expertise, production, bottles and vintages. Shrigley is particularly concerned with climate change and preserving the environment and these themes are also reflected in the artworks created for Ruinart. The project resulted in a collection of drawings, paintings and pots as well as carvings in the walls of the house’s crayerés (chalk caves). He has also designed a jeroboam of Ruinart Blanc de Blancs, limited to just 30 pieces.

Shrigley says of the project, ‘When making art on the subject of champagne production, one must make several visits to the Champagne region. One must visit the crayerés and the wineyards and the production facilities and one must ask questions of the people who work there and listen very carefully to what they say. And, most importantly, you must drink some champagne.’

Find out more about the collaboration on the Ruinart website and look out for an installation of the work at art fairs later this year